LearnBop Community Blog

Show Me the Money: 6 Steps to Help Teachers Advocate for an EdTech Purchase

Posted by Chris Brida

Jun 29, 2015 10:11:00 AM


It’s that time of the year—budget time! Well, actually it’s not that time of the year because budgets are frozen, but it’s the time of year to start thinking about what you might want for your classroom next year. And I’m not talking about pencils and paper, I’m talking about technology.

You’ve gone to all the tradeshows, your colleagues have told you what’s good, and now you just need to convince your principal to make an investment in you and your classroom. I’m very purposeful about my use of “investment” here, because that’s what EdTech is. You aren’t just throwing money into a wishing well and hoping for something good. Instead, you’re going through a very deliberate process and asking your principal to make an investment in the success of your classroom.

So now what? You want it, but how do you get it? There’s a process that I think is tried and true (I’ve tried it once, and it worked!) that I want to share with you about going through the procurement process with your principal.

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Topics: Implementing the Common Core, Resources, State News

Five Things You Didn't Know About the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP)

Posted by David Moadel

Jun 25, 2015 7:00:00 AM

 

In alignment with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which Missouri adopted in 2010, and the Missouri Show Me Standards, the MAP exams are intended to bring data-driven instruction to classrooms and increased accountability to the state's public education system.  

Given that the MAP tests are an integral part of schooling in Missouri, we wanted to share this list of five things you might not already know about the assessments.

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Topics: Implementing the Common Core, Resources, State News

Five Things You Didn't Know About North Carolina's End-of-Grade Tests

Posted by David Moadel

Jun 24, 2015 12:50:00 PM

 

North Carolina's State Board of Education has never backed down from the challenge of measuring student proficiency, and the state willingly raised its academic standards when it adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in 2010 to work in conjunction with its own set of rigorous benchmarks. 

In developing standardized assessments with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, North Carolina became proactive in evaluating the academic progress of its K-12 public school students so that instruction could be adjusted and accountability maintained. The result is a suite of assessments known as the North Carolina End-of-Grade Tests, and these tests are like nothing North Carolina has seen before. 

We can examine—or perhaps re-examine—how the state chooses to assess its students with the following five facts pertaining to the North Carolina End-of-Grade Tests.

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Topics: Implementing the Common Core, Resources, State News

Five Things You Didn't Know About Illinois' PARCC Assessments

Posted by David Moadel

Jun 23, 2015 5:47:00 PM

 

Content standards inform what teachers teach by defining what students must learn. With this in mind, the Illinois State Board of Education took a big step in 2010 when it joined more than 40 states in adopting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), thereby crystallizing the state's proficiency expectations for its public school students2010 was also the year in which Illinois adopted the new Illinois Learning Standards in English/language arts and math. 

Full implementation of the CCSS in Illinois in 2013-2014 meant that new standardized assessments were warranted, and as a result, 2014 saw the transition from the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to the state's new Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessments. 

It's a new generation of assessments for a state and a nation that demands it, but what do we know about Illinois' latest round of tests?  The five facts below are meant to shine some light on what the IL PARCC assessments are all about.

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Topics: Implementing the Common Core, Resources, State News

Five Things You Didn't Know About the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress (M-STEP)

Posted by David Moadel

Jun 22, 2015 8:18:00 AM

 

2010 was a banner year for the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), since it was the year in which so many states adopted these standards and made them an integral part of public school education.  

CCSS adoption took place in the great state of Michigan in 2010, signaling a commitment to high standards of learning for K-12 students. With the 44-year-old Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) still in place, however, the state's legislature and the Michigan Department of Education decided it was time to step it up—hence the advent of the M-STEP, or Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress.

The decision was made in June 2014 and the new assessments were rolled out in spring of 2015, thus requiring Michigan's public school students, parents, and educators to adapt to these new tests in a relatively short period of time. 

Given the pace and significance of this change, it's worth taking a look at some facts and figures that you might not already know about the M-STEP. 

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Topics: Implementing the Common Core, Resources, State News

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